Nature

Good News about a Bad Word

The word is Vaccine: Yikes! Let’s get right down to it: a vaccine against poison ivy will soon be available, but only if you really, really, really want it. Promise.

Volume 17, Issue 5, May 2022
Paul Hetzler

Springtime Rite — Fox Kits

My diary temporarily becomes a record of firsts — first trout lily, first muskrat, first loon. And for two consecutive years now, first sighting of fox kits.

Volume 17, Issue 5, May 2022
Glenn Sandiford

The Muskrat

If there was one animal that everyone on the island admired, it was the muskrat.

Volume 17, Issue 5, May 2022
Manley L. Rusho

Island Archaeology

A 2019 organized boat trip inviting a formidable group of archeologists and specialists. The boat trip was an opportunity to demonstrate our region’s rich archaeological heritage.

Volume 17, Issue 5, May 2022
Ross Holbrook

The National Environmental Policy Act

The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) was signed into law on 1 January 1970. It’s one of the shortest laws in the US – a total of six pages. It’s short, sweet, and to the point.

Volume 17, Issue 5, May 2022
Elspeth Naismith

Island Winter

People who hear that I spent my winter on an island in upstate New York typically have one of three responses. They're envious; they couldn't do it because they'd feel lonely; or ask, with dismissive incredulity, “Why would you freeze your ass off wintering in the Thousand Islands?”

Volume 17, Issue 4, April 2022
Glenn Sandiford

Agreement Reached to Protect Blind Bay; TILT to Conserve Critical River Habitat

(Clayton, NY) Wednesday, April 13 – The Thousand Islands Land Trust (TILT) today announced that it has reached an agreement with Blind Bay Associates LLC to acquire the 295 feet of undeveloped waterfront and adjacent 20 plus acres of upland in Blind Bay.

Volume 17, Issue 4, April 2022
Jake Tibbles

Synthetic Photosynthesis!

Every so often, an obscure technical innovation really lights me up. In the fall of 2021, a team of German scientists published a report on their work injecting tadpole noggins with algae.

Volume 17, Issue 4, April 2022
Paul Hetzler

Growing Community in the Garden

Each spring, about 20 families, swaddled in raincoats and fleece, don their rubber boots and brave the changeable April weather to begin rousing a little corner of Zenda Farms Preserve.

Volume 17, Issue 4, April 2022
Shannon Walter

Water Wellness

Academic testing is like water testing in that a passing grade in one realm doesn’t apply to others. Just as an algebra exam won’t affect your history grade (or it shouldn’t) . . .

Volume 17, Issue 3, March 2022
Paul Hetzler

Potholes, Kettles, and Ponds, Oh My!

It started out as a matter of curiosity. But it ended up being an adventure. Ever since the creation of the McFarlane hiking trail, we have enjoyed an occasional hike around the field within sight of the fascinating and historic Zenda Farms.

Volume 17, Issue 3, March 2022
Patty Mondore

All That Glitters Isn’t Green

I never would have imagined that glitter could be a pollutant of concern. At my age, I need glasses to find a postage stamp – it’s a long shot that I could help pick up glitter.

Volume 17, Issue 2, February 2022
Paul Hetzler

A Kingfisher Tale

One day we received a call from Kit Chubb. She had just received a clutch of seven kingfisher fledglings. They had been rescued from a deserted nest tunnel. It had been wrecked by road construction work along the high sandy road bank.

Volume 17, Issue 2, February 2022
Ralph Boston

Probably Good News – Coopers Hawk

Did you know that many states and federal governments in North America passed legislation protecting birds of prey? Author Gerry Smith will explain . . .

Volume 17, Issue 2, February 2022
Gerry Smith

Swan Song

Out of the corner of my eye, I thought I saw two large white UFOs, flying along the shoreline. I listened carefully and, sure enough, I heard that familiar whistling sound. I pulled out my camera and wildly aimed . . .

Volume 17, Issue 2, February 2022
Patty Mondore

The Mutants Have Landed

The marmorkreb, a.k.a. marbled crayfish, is a destructive new species that first appeared in aquariums in Germany. . . They are here now, and your help scouting for them is both invaluable and essential.

Volume 17, Issue 1, January 2022
Paul Hetzler

Snowy Owls are back again!

An active bird watcher in the North County reasonably expects to see several Snowies each winter - why? It involves climate change.

Volume 17, Issue 1, January 2022
Gerry Smith

Conserving Island Number Nine

Local property owners understand the importance of conserving Island Number Nine and the impact that the Island has on the ecological and fiscal health of the area.

Volume 17, Issue 1, January 2022
Spencer Busler